Tag Archives: juggalo street gang

Two Juggalo transients plead guilty in fatal beating of mentally ill man


The trial of two transients accused of beating a mentally ill man to death in Seattle in 2008 came to a halt when both pleaded guilty to first-degree murder.

For their pleas, Steven Bauder and Marcus Dennis each will face a standard-range sentence that tops out at just over 26 years in prison.

Prosecutors plan to ask for a 25-year sentence for both men; the defense lawyers say they will be seeking 20 years behind bars.

The two will likely be sentenced early next year.

Had the case been resolved by trial, the men could have faced up to life in prison because of sentencing enhancements that had been sought by the prosecution. The enhancements, known as aggravators, were dropped as part of the plea agreements, said Bauder’s defense attorney Peter Geisness.

Relatives of victim Noel Lopez say the end to the nearly two-week trial brought relief and disappointment. The slain man’s brother and sister said Thursday that the plea means that neither defendant will serve a life sentence.

“In one way it’s a relief to have it resolved quickly, but the frightening thing is that these guys will be on the streets again,” said the slain man’s sister, Lita Lopez, 35, of Los Angeles.

Before entering his guilty plea on Thursday, Bauder, 25, asked Superior Court Judge Catherine Shaffer if she was certain that Lopez was really dead. When the judge said yes, he agreed to enter the plea.

Bauder insists that the slaying was not premeditated, said Geisness.

Dennis, 22, pleaded guilty on Monday. His lawyer, Julie Gaisford, said Thursday that her mentally ill client attacked Lopez because he believed the man had raped a homeless girl.

Seattle police say that Lopez, 25, was obsessed with the then-15-year-old girl but the two never had a sexual relationship.

Lopez was killed at a construction site in the 1000 block of Fourth Avenue on April 14, 2008.

Prosecutors had earlier said they would try to have Bauder’s sentence enhanced by claiming he committed the murder as a member of a street gang, the Downtown Juggalos. It would’ve marked the first time that the King County Prosecutor’s Office has used the state’s gang statute in a case involving a Juggalo, a nickname for fans of the Detroit-based heavy-metal/rap duo Insane Clown Posse.

Prosecutors said Dennis, whose nickname is “Smurf,” was not a member of the Downtown Juggalos.

 

Juggalos – Worlds Largest Street Gang


LARGEST STREET GANG IN AMERICA – JUGGALOS BE PROUD

Juggalos ruin lives – Rip David Shern


Loveland murder victim remembered

On Sunday mornings, David Shern liked to take his son and daughter out for breakfast.

He liked to teach them how to fish.

Like most fathers, Shern enjoyed sharing his time and knowledge with his children, 8-year-old Kaitlynn and 10-year-old Caelan.

On April 30, 2009, a man identified as a follower of the Juggalos street gang, who Shern didn’t know, stabbed Shern with a 14-inch sword after an altercation at Loveland’s North Lake Park.

Shern, 34, who was hospitalized after the stabbing, died one day later.

That day, the children Shern raised, who are now admired by adults for their upbringing and good manners, lost their father.

That day, Priscilla Stamp lost her son.

And although she is dealing with her own grief, Stamp said the hardest part of her son’s death is watching her grandchildren move on without him.

“To see how much I miss him is hard enough,” Stamp said recently. “But then to listen to the children, how much they miss him. That just breaks your heart when they start talking. There’s those spurts where they’ll just burst into tears and they want their dad.”

Friends and members of Shern’s family recently gathered in Loveland to mark the one-year anniversary of his death.

Afterward, they talked with Loveland Connection about Shern and their beliefs that he died at the hands of Loveland gang members.

Lives changed
Since losing her son, Stamp said it’s difficult to detail how much her life has changed.

“I don’t even know words to sum it up,” she said. “It’s been devastating. My life stopped at that moment. It all just stopped.”

While coming to terms with their loss, Stamp’s and Shern’s family and friends also have had to deal with their grief while sitting through hearings and watching people involved in the case face justice.

Sarah Sypian, a close friend to Shern, attended many of those court hearings.

“You want to see it through, you want to see an end. You want to see justice,” she said. “It wasn’t easy, that’s for sure. … Nothing will ever bring him back.”

During many of the court proceedings, Stamp said it was frustrating to hear people talk badly about her son.

She was especially hurt by accusations made about her son saying he acted aggressively and violently toward people the night of his death because he had been laid off from his job.

Stamp said her son knew his work was temporary at the time of his death.

“So, none of it made sense to me,” she said. “In my heart, I just couldn’t put it together.”

Larry Walters, 20, was sentenced in November 2009 to 12 years in prison for reckless manslaughter in the stabbing death of Shern.

Two other people were charged with being accomplices in the case.

Christopher Hatch, whose flame-shaped sword was used to stab Shern and who helped hide the weapon after the assault, will serve one year at the Larimer County Detention Center.

Melissa Deeb, 19, who hid the weapon in her parents’ motor home, received a 45-day sentence for her involvement in the incident.

The gang connection
During an April court hearing, Stamp stood before Larimer County District Court Judge Stephen Schapanski and said Walters and his friends are members of the Juggalos street gang, a group that follows the Insane Clown Posse band and started as a Detroit street gang.

And although Loveland police have classified this case as gang-related, the case was never dealt with as if it was gang-related, she said.

This week, Loveland Police spokesman Sgt. Jan Burreson said Walters never was identified by police as a gang member, but officers were aware that information on his MySpace page mentioned the Juggalos and he liked to listen to Insane Clown Posse.

“According to us, there was no gang relation there,” Burreson said, adding that the assault on Shern was not a planned crime.

In the past, Loveland police officials have said they will not attribute gang activity to gang members because they do not want to glorify their actions.

Still, Stamp said she wants people in the community to be aware of gang activity in town and know exactly who their children are associated with.

“You worry about your kids when they drive to Denver or something, but I never would have dreamt that something like this would have happened in Loveland,” Stamp said of her son’s death.

To help people learn from her son’s death, Stamp hopes to encourage lawmakers to formally recognize the Juggalos street gang as one that operates in Colorado.

Lawmakers in Utah, Arizona and California already have done so, Stamp said.

“How do you prosecute them if they’re not recognized legally as a gang,” Stamp asked.

Earlier this year, Loveland police hosted a community forum focused on increased gang activity in the city.

During the forum, more than 200 residents gathered as Loveland police officer Tammy Fisher talked about the types of gangs in Loveland and graffiti they post around town.

Fisher said the Juggalos is an active gang in Loveland.

The Loveland Police Department has documented 262 gang members, 69 of those gang members are juveniles.

In response to gang activity in the community, officials with the Loveland Police Department have started outreach efforts and encouraged people to spend more time with their children, being engaged in their day-to-day activities.

At the county level, Deputy District Attorney Shaun Reinhart will serve as the Larimer County Detention Center’s office liaison and specialize in gang activity for all law enforcement agencies, said district attorney spokeswoman Linda Jensen.

Remembering
Now that the people involved with Shern’s death have been sentenced, Stamp said she is focused on bringing routine back to her family member’s lives and remembering her son.

Most of Stamp’s family lives in Iowa and many have visited Loveland in recent months to help her through the difficult times.

Through family support and memories shared about her son, Stamp said she hopes to help her grandchildren come to terms with their lives now.

Earlier this month, about 90 people attended a service at Resthaven Memorial Gardens, where Shern is buried, to mark the one-year anniversary of his death.

People like Sypian and Jeremy Olson, longtime friends of Shern, shared stories of spending time with him.

Olson was friends with Shern for 30 years, he said.

“At a drop of a hat, he would be there,” Olson said. “I just called him out of the blue one day, hoping that he would be around because I knew that he knew how to do drywall and asked him if he wanted to help drywall my garage and on moments notice he’s like, ‘Yea, lets do it.’ ”

In addition to his dedication, Olson said Shern had a sense of humor and was someone people wanted to be around.

“He was so funny,” Olson said. “He could always pull you out of a bad mood.”

Sypian agreed.

“He could lift your spirits,” she said. “He had a knack of doing that.”

Sypian and Shern were schoolmates at Thompson Valley High School, where Sypian said he was her first love.

Throughout the years, she said they remained good friends and he always had a way of lifting her spirits.

Such memories of her son are nice for Stamp to hear, she said.

They help her think back on how he lived his life and are now helping her make decisions with his children for their futures.

“On his Facebook (page) after this happened, everyone (wrote) how much they were going to miss him, and that he had their backs since grade school,” Stamp said.

another juggalo gang attack – JH is a group willing to stop the crimes …


juggalos gang

another day another gang crime commited by face painted idiots . The Jh is a group willing to help convert your child into a law abiding citizan . please visit http://juggaloholocaust.com/ to help protect your children from becoming criminals

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Two teens arrested for beating homeless people are members of an emerging street gang known for painting their faces like clowns, say police.

Jonathan Appelt and Robert Griffin told officers they were “juggalos” when they were arrested for three violent attacks on the homeless, said Lt. Tim Brewer

Juggalos have their roots in a rap group called the Insane Clown Posse. They paint their faces black and white, like ICP members, and sometimes wear clothing or have tattoos of the Hatchetman, an ICP logo.

Appelt had a hatchet similar to one carried by the Hatchetman when he was arrested, said Brewer.

Brewer said the suspects were known to paint their faces black and white, although they were not painted when they allegedly attacked homeless men in October and twice in January.

Corvalls Police Capt. John Sassman classifed Appelt and Griffin as the gang’s ringleaders. He estimated the Corvallis group had anywhere from two to 10 people in it.

“It is kind of disturbing to have an emerging group that is involved in criminal activity,” said Brewer.

The group popped up on the police department’s radar last summer when a young man snatched a woman’s purse in downtown. She described the suspect as a young man with his face painted black and white.

While the majority of ICP fans, who call themselves juggalos, are in gangs, some criminal sects have formed.

Corvallis police believe Appelt and Griffin are involved in one of those sects.

“I think any time you have a group of individuals that have a common ideology or intent to commit crimes and identify themselves with a certain type of appearance or dress or following,” said Lt. Brewe, “and they’re also committing crimes such as these, I do believe that makes them a criminal gang. Not to say that everyone juggalo is a gang.”

On Monday, Benton County Chief Deputy District Attorney Christian Stringer to dismiss one count of robbery in the second degree and one count of intimidation in the second degree against each suspect.

According to court documents, “the alleged victim in counts 1 & 2 admittedly lied about the circumstances of the assault, robbery and intimidation. While the police were learning of this new information, Defendant Robert Griffin asked to contact police officers from the jail and subsequently told the police that he had given a false confession relating to that incident.”

A grand jury is deciding whether or not to charge Appelt and Griffin with other counts.

The suspects were also arrested in December in connection with the theft of $4,000 worth of equipment belonging to the Oregon State University crew team facility.

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