Tag Archives: street gang

Two Juggalo transients plead guilty in fatal beating of mentally ill man


The trial of two transients accused of beating a mentally ill man to death in Seattle in 2008 came to a halt when both pleaded guilty to first-degree murder.

For their pleas, Steven Bauder and Marcus Dennis each will face a standard-range sentence that tops out at just over 26 years in prison.

Prosecutors plan to ask for a 25-year sentence for both men; the defense lawyers say they will be seeking 20 years behind bars.

The two will likely be sentenced early next year.

Had the case been resolved by trial, the men could have faced up to life in prison because of sentencing enhancements that had been sought by the prosecution. The enhancements, known as aggravators, were dropped as part of the plea agreements, said Bauder’s defense attorney Peter Geisness.

Relatives of victim Noel Lopez say the end to the nearly two-week trial brought relief and disappointment. The slain man’s brother and sister said Thursday that the plea means that neither defendant will serve a life sentence.

“In one way it’s a relief to have it resolved quickly, but the frightening thing is that these guys will be on the streets again,” said the slain man’s sister, Lita Lopez, 35, of Los Angeles.

Before entering his guilty plea on Thursday, Bauder, 25, asked Superior Court Judge Catherine Shaffer if she was certain that Lopez was really dead. When the judge said yes, he agreed to enter the plea.

Bauder insists that the slaying was not premeditated, said Geisness.

Dennis, 22, pleaded guilty on Monday. His lawyer, Julie Gaisford, said Thursday that her mentally ill client attacked Lopez because he believed the man had raped a homeless girl.

Seattle police say that Lopez, 25, was obsessed with the then-15-year-old girl but the two never had a sexual relationship.

Lopez was killed at a construction site in the 1000 block of Fourth Avenue on April 14, 2008.

Prosecutors had earlier said they would try to have Bauder’s sentence enhanced by claiming he committed the murder as a member of a street gang, the Downtown Juggalos. It would’ve marked the first time that the King County Prosecutor’s Office has used the state’s gang statute in a case involving a Juggalo, a nickname for fans of the Detroit-based heavy-metal/rap duo Insane Clown Posse.

Prosecutors said Dennis, whose nickname is “Smurf,” was not a member of the Downtown Juggalos.

 

Violent street clowns hit Sydney – Meet the Juggalos and Juggalettes


A NOTORIOUS American youth gang known for its violent street crime and penchant for wearing clown make-up as a disguise has hit Sydney.

Police are investigating a possible connection between an attempted robbery in Fairfield and the gang known as “Juggalos” – or Juggalettes, for female members – made famous by criminal activities in the US.

The gang is also believed to be trying to recruit more members, with the group holding what is believed to be its first national “gathering” in Victoria next month. The gang already runs a number of online blogs and chat sites for members and those aspiring to join.

Three men wearing the Juggalos’ trademark clown make-up attempted to rob a woman outside Fairfield RSL Club and were captured on CCTV footage wearing their “disguise”.

About 12.10am on June 28, a 20-year-old woman was waiting outside the club for her boyfriend to pick her up when she was approached by the youths.

The men pulled chains from their pockets and demanded the woman’s bag but when her boyfriend arrived they ran off towards the train station empty-handed.

Fairfield crime manager detective Inspector Gary Bailey confirmed police were investigating

“We’re keeping an open mind, there are a number of lines of inquiry and that [the Juggalos] is one,” he said.

Juggalos and Juggalettes – who have been classified as a gang in at least six states of America – are fans of hard-core hip-hop and rap groups such as Insane Clown Posse.

Insp Bailey said while masks, including clown masks, had been used by criminals in the past as disguises during a crime, this was the first time he was aware of a group of men walking around the city wearing clown make-up looking for potential targets.

“The make-up makes it a fairly unique thing for us,” he said.

Insp Bailey said the use of chains as a weapon was also “disturbing”.

The woman was not hurt in the attack although she was “obviously shocked”, Insp Bailey said. He said police believed members of the public knew the identity of the “clowns”.

“We’re appealing for information from the public because we believe these persons, if continually allowed to commit criminal offences, could cause serious injuries to members of the public” Insp Bailey said

Members of the Juggalo and Insane clown posse arrested


juggalo gang keeps getting more rampant
look at this article , they have no respect for the legal system and would hiss at a judge after going to a court in some ratty hatchet gear.

4 admit to charges in Modesto assault case

One Juggalos defendant to serve 7 years in prison

By MERRILL BALASSONE
The Modesto Bee

MODESTO — Four followers of the band Insane Clown Posse admitted in court Monday to acting as members of a criminal street gang that police call Juggalos when they assaulted a man strolling with his daughters through Graceada Park a year ago.

Brandon Ferrell, 19, Kurt Petersen, 23, and Larry Williams, 20, pleaded no contest to a felony charge of assault likely to produce great bodily injury in addition to a gang enhancement. Joshua Huggins, 18, pleaded guilty to the same charge and enhancement.

A judge sentenced Williams, who has a previous conviction under the state’s “three strikes” law, to seven years in state prison.

Petersen, Ferrell and Huggins each got a year in county jail. Ferrell and Huggins were expected to be released from jail Monday because they have served their time. Petersen still must serve several months of his 365-day sentence.

All four waived their right to appeal their convictions.

“For me, it wasn’t an easy call,” Deputy District Attorney Marlisa Ferreira said of offering the plea deal. “The defendants were very young, but (the victim) was critically injured. In the end, I think justice was served.” Monday morning, the courtroom gallery was filled with young people, some in Insane Clown Posse clothing. A few hissed and scoffed as victim William August, 54, called Juggalos “dangerous, malevolent gangbangers” and detailed the pain he’s been through since the March 7, 2009, attack.

“The injuries I sustained in the mob attack were grievous,” August said, after limping to the front of the courtroom to address Judge Nancy Ashley. “I’ll never walk normally again.” August, who is 6 feet 8 inches tall, said he tried to do the right thing by walking away but fears what he might do if attacked again.

Ferreira acknowledged that not all people who listen to Insane Clown Posse are gang members. But she said the men are more than fans of the band, whose lyrics are so raw they wouldn’t be heard on mainstream radio, because they travel in a pack, share a common sign or symbol — the cartoon hatchet man associated with the Detroit-based band — and commit crimes.

Defense attorneys said their clients are just young men who got drunk and behaved badly.

Ferrell, Huggins and Petersen each could face seven to 10 years in prison if they violate the terms of their felony probation.

Read more: http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2010/03/24/1360708/4-admit-to-charges-in-modesto.html#ixzz0j9ZusOId

justice for all

Juggalos and icp are not a gang —- REALLY????


ENID — Local teachers have long maintained they’ve seen signs of gang activity in Enid Public Schools, and information provided during a Monday professional day by Enid Police Officer Steve Miller confirmed for many that gangs are active in Enid.

Miller, who currently is a K-9 officer but also has worked in narcotics and has special training in gang activity, told a standing-room-only workshop Monday there are several gang associations in Enid.

He spoke as part of a day-long professional day training for EPS teachers. Teachers selected several seminars to attend, and Miller talked to a group of teachers about the primary gang associations he’s seen in Enid, including Crips, Bloods, MS-13 and Insane Clown Posse (ICP).

Miller said the appeal of being in a gang includes respect, reputation and revenge.

While gang members may have a twisted ideology of what those things mean, he said those three things are evident in every gang since the beginning of gang activity.

He said much of the gang activity that is in Enid began with gang organizations started on the West Coast back in the 1970s.

“Enid has a large population of ICP, Bloods, Crips and MS-13,” Miller said. The police officer spoke to teachers about some of the colors and signs worn by members of these gangs.

Members of the these gangs have traditionally adopted certain professional sports team colors and wear the jerseys of those teams. They’ve also adopted certain signs or symbols that can be seen on their clothes and also by “tagging” property, such as spray painting graffiti on property.

Teachers in the room nodded their heads in agreement with some of the information Miller was presenting.

He maintains the Bloods and Crips associations in Enid are often long-time family relations, saying he’s arrested sons, daughters and fathers from the same gangs. They mainly operate in selling drugs in the community, he said.

MS-13 is the largest gang in the United States, Miller said, and is primarily a Hispanic gang.

A relatively new group, and one he says many young people in Enid associate with — and one many of the teachers said they see on a regular basis — is the Insane Clown Posse.

Miller said they are less violent than the Bloods, Crips and MS-13 groups, but they still are dangerous. The ICP originated out of Detroit in the 1990s from a rap duo with KISS-like face paint, and they claim they mainly are “appreciators of music,” Miller said. Followers of ICP say they shouldn’t be classified as a gang just because they dress differently and listen to a certain type of music.

He said these young people like to go to the metro areas to go to concerts, they often wear outrageous outfits and paint their faces, and they have a fascination with knives and swords. Miller said they call themselves Juggalos, and their mascot is a cartoonish silhouette of a man carrying a hatchet.

He said many of the kids drink orange soda, specifically a brand called Faygo. He added they have a fascination with championship wrestling.

The crimes they have committed are primarily burglaries, Miller said.

Teachers said they have seen the hatchet man logo on cars and also as tattoos on students.

Miller said many of the ICP will “grow out of” their association with the gang as they get older.

Miller said the motorcycle gang Mongols also is active in Enid. He said 99 percent of motorcycle riders are not affiliated with any kind of gang, but the Mongols are “one percenters,” who operate in drug dealing and other crimes. Oklahoma members will wear a leather vest or jacket that has Mongols Oklahoma on it.